Utilizing Peer and External Review Processes for Continuous Curricular Improvement

Developing a culture of continuous improvement within your housing and residence life department requires one to put structures in place to gather assessment data and utilize that data to make change. Furthermore, it requires the identification and standards against which a department can compare their progress and determine and prioritize goals. Within the area of…

How to Conduct an Archeological Dig and Write a Curricular Educational Priority

One of the very first steps one undertakes when developing a residential curriculum is crafting an educational priority. An educational priority is the basis upon which all other goals and outcomes are derived. Based in the mission, context, and values of your institution, an educational priority should provide a broad statement about what your division or department…

The Difference Between a “Mission Statement” and an “Educational Priority” in a Curriculum

In developing a residential curriculum, one of the first tasks a residence life department undertakes is the establishment of an educational priority. An educational priority is summative statement of what students will learn by their participation in a curriculum. An educational priority is broad, informed by research and theory, and contextualized to an individual campus and student population.…

Four Ways Residence Life Education Can Go Wrong

There are a number of practices in residential life and education that have become commonplace, but that don’t always advance our roles as educators and student affairs professionals.  Over my many years in residence life, I’ve seen the following four ideas surface again and again. They are concepts that seem to be ingrained in our collective…