Breaking Down Curricular Learning Goals into Learning Outcomes

Continuing down the cascade of your curriculum, one becomes more specific in the learning objectives one hopes residents will achieve. In this way, the cascade functions as nested structure includes successively more specific statements as one moves towards the level of practice. One’s educational priority is the broadest statement of learning one hopes students will achieve. It is typically divided in 3-5 learning goals, and these learning goals are in turn divided into 4-6 learning outcomes. It is at this level, the level of learning outcomes, that one begins to see the… Read More

Does Your Residential Curriculum Cascade?

An important concept in developing intentional learning experiences for students is the idea of the “cascade.” Much like the successive steps of a waterfall, as water flows from one plateau to another, learning goals and outcomes in a residential curriculum should flow from more general statements of educational priority down to more specific and measurable student-level outcomes. Cascading goals can also be used for a number of different purposes outside of a curriculum, including staff development and and departmental planning. The key to these processes, however, is to create links to ensure that all… Read More

Technology Is A Tool, NOT A Learning Outcome

All too frequently, we become enamored with the bells and whistles of technology without taking a step back to examine our goals for using it.  Bill Ferriter, of the Center for Teaching Quality, created the following image to demonstrate how learning to use technology can be conflated with learning what technology can enable us to do.  It provides an excellent reminder that as educators, although it is important that we teach students about how digital tools work, it is even more important that we enable and empower students to explore and use these tools to… Read More

5 Outcomes #PechaKucha Presentations Can Teach You

From the first ACPA PechaKucha session, to its adoption as a conference-wide event, a number of faculty have begun to utilize the presentation style as a class assignment for their students.  For a few years, I have avoided assigning this to my own students.  I thought it was just too hard.  That it required too advanced a skill set.  I’ve since changed my mind and this semester I am assigning my students a PechaKucha assignment for the first time.  As I reflected, I realized there were just too many positive outcomes associated with the… Read More